Recovering InnoDB Tables In MySQL 5

Saturday, April 27th, 2013

The following procedure can be used to recover InnoDB database tables from a backup of a MySQL server that had the “innodb_file_per_table” setting but all the metadata (in the “ibdata*” files) was lost – for example due to a server crash.

The process involves two steps:

  1. Recover the table structure from the .frm files
  2. Recover the data from the .ibd files (InnoDB tablespace)

There is a lot of copying the backed up files over and over to the MySQL datadir, so its useful to have the backup available on the database server machine. In my setup the backup for the databases was copied to the directory “backup” under the database’s datadir, so – for example – for the table somedb.sometable there exist files somedb/backup/sometable.frm and somedb/backup/sometable.ibd.

Additionally the process for recovering the table structures creates a lot of superfluous metadata in the InnoDB data files, so after the first stage I’m going to destroy the InnoDB data files and let the InnoDB engine re-generate them – as a result any existing InnoDB tables will be destroyed. This is important so I’ll iterate: using the procedure detailed here will destroy any existing and working InnoDB databases! So this procedure is useful to recover a destroyed database server to a new server or as a temporary measure on a temporary server to be able to dump the data to SQL files that will later be loaded into an existing server.

There likely a way to do this which is less heavy handed – for example, check out this article from Percona’s MySQL blog, but for my purpose this is enough.

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Script Day: automatically locate the next valid transaction in MySQL binlog

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

Sometimes the MySQL replication breaks due to some corruption in the binary log files(1). When your binary log files are corrupted, the only option (other then trying to rebuild a database of hundreds of gigabytes) is to try to skip over the corrupted region and get the slave to pick up from where the transactions are valid.

Locating the correct position in the binary log from which the server can carry on is difficult but can be made easier by the mysqlbinlog utility that can scan the binary log files and show you which position is valid using the --start-position to try random positions in the binary log file and see which position will let you read from the file(2).

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  1. I have yet to find a good explanation to why it happens and how to prevent that []
  2. because in the binary log transactions can have any size, so they can end and start at any point []

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